In The Balcony
inthebalcony.com

Welcome to the new, improved  IN THE BALCONY

We're exclusively devoted to vintage movies & TV shows on DVD/Blu-ray, from screen classics to B-movie gems to cheesy sci-fi and obscure weirdities scraped up from the viewing room floor.


Peruse our pages for news of upcoming DVD/Blu-ray releases, our weekly local Friday Night Films schedule, and this week's reviews, including A Woman in Flames, Batman, and more!



It’s always a joy to read a new book by our pal Sgt. Bill Cassara; the author of wonderful biographies of great cinema funnymen Edgar Kennedy and Vernon Dent is back with a terrific book called Nobody’s Stooge, a biography of Ted Healy, the stage comic best remembered today for being the “boss” of the Three Stooges early in their stage and cinema careers.








Balcony_Logo_New_6418.png

Say, we'd LOVE to hear from you... Use the "Contact Us" button and let us know what suggestions you have for the newly revised site. We've already been asked a few things... and rest assured, the newly renovated LAUREL & HARDY FUN HOUSE will return soon!

nobodysstooge.jpg

Healy (born Ernest Nash in 1896) was a childhood friend of Moe Howard’s, and he and his brother Shemp were on-again, off-again parts of Ted’s vaudeville act throughout the 1920s, following him as his career escalated into such Broadway successes as A Night in Spain (1927) and A Night in Venice (1928). By that time, the talented Larry Fine had joined the act. Shemp left for good in 1930, and little brother Jerry “Curly” Howard replaced him. In the early 1930s, Ted Healy and his Stooges performed for MGM in such short subjects as Plane Nuts (1933) and The Big Idea (1934) and contributed to such features as Dancing Lady (1933, with Clark Gable and Joan Crawford) and the all-star Hollywood Party (1934) with Jimmy Durante and Laurel & Hardy.


In 1934, the Stooges went off on their own to Columbia Pictures while Ted stuck with MGM and made memorable appearances in such films as Mad Love (1935), San Francisco (1936), and Hollywood Hotel (released in 1938).


On December 17, 1937, Ted Healy’s wife Betty presented him with his first child, and the alcoholic Healy went on a celebratory bender that resulted in his mysterious death a few days later. Over the decades, many vicious rumors have sprouted up about the death of Ted Healy; Sgt. Cassara’s book clears them up, thankfully, once and for all.


Nobody's Stooge is a must-have for Three Stooges fans, people who love MGM films of the ‘30s, and movie scholars who want to learn more about one of the most respected entertainers of his era. The book includes many, many photos, a timeline of Healy/Stooges important dates, and of course an in-depth filmography of Ted’s Hollywood career. Drew Friedman contributes the forward and a nice portrait of Healy, too. You can order the book from Amazon.com HERE.